How to Make Hydrangea Paper

We use dried hydrangea flowers for so many things, why not make paper with them too? It’s a great way to repurpose flowers we were about to toss into the compost and junk mail that was destined for the recycling bin. Making floral paper by hand also gives you a way to express yourself, preserve your garden, and give a gift with that extra special personal touch.

Gather Materials

  • water
  • bucket
  • torn or shredded paper (not coated)
  • dried hydrangeas (we used Zinfin Doll and Incrediball hydrangea flowers) or other flowers (we used pressed Perfecto Mundo azalea blooms)
  • blender (If you plan to make a LOT of paper, get a blender from a second hand
    store. Otherwise, just clean your regular blender thoroughly after the project.)
  • rectangular storage bin
  • old picture frame
  • screen
  • heavy duty stapler
  • scissors
  • sponge
  • wax paper

Make

Shredded paper and dried hydrangea flowers are in a bucket of water.
  • add shredded paper and dried flowers to the water filled bucket
  • mix wet + dry ingredients
  • let the combination sit for a few hours 
Making a paper making screen with mesh and an old photo frame.
  • take the glass and backing off of an old photo frame
  • with a heavy duty stapler, attach mesh tightly to the back of the frame’s edges
  • cut away excess mesh
Dried Perfecto Mundo azalea flowers and dried Zinfin Doll hydrangea flowers combined with shredded paper and water in a blender.
  • put the paper/flower mixture into a blender
  • add dried flowers
  • blend until you can no longer see large bits of paper (this is called slurry)
Adding paper and flower slurry into a bin of water.
  • pour slurry into the storage bin
  • add water to the storage bin
  • if you’d like, add larger pieces of pressed flowers
Dipping paper screen into the slurry and water tub.
  • stir up slurry combination with your hands
  • immediately afterward, dip screen into water and slurry combination
  • pull screen up when enough material has settled on top
  • gently shake to remove water
  • flip mixture onto wax paper (it’s best to prepare slowly and then flip swiftly) 
  • press down on screen with a sponge to remove water
  • wring water out into bin
  • grab both sides of one end of the screen and gently pull upward, releasing the pressed slurry
Wet floral paper on wax paper.
  • let it dry for a day or so
  • put a fan near the area to help it dry faster
Removing floral paper from wax paper gently by sliding fingers between them.
  • carefully separate the new paper and the wax paper, starting at one end
Hands holding finished hydrangea floral paper up against the light of a window to reveal detail of paper bits and flowers combined to make paper.
  • enjoy the detail
  • make those craft dreams a reality

Craft!

Here are a few of the ways we used our finished hydrangea paper. 

Valentine's Day Gift
Votive Covering
Classic Stationary
Making Art With Kids
Photo Backdrop
Handmade hydrangea paper cards.
Handmade Cards

How would you use handmade hydrangea paper? 
Tell us in the comments below!

Written by
Kristina Howley

Kristina Howley

I am all in when it comes to gardening. Almost every part of the experience delights me – new leaves emerging in spring, pollinators buzzing in summer, birds devouring berries in fall, and the somber beauty of seed heads in winter. Thanks to a background in horticulture and gardening my own clay-filled, flowery USDA zone 5b plot, I’ve learned plenty of practical things as well. I like sharing these joys and lessons with my fellow gardeners and soon-to-be gardeners any way I can.

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2 Responses

  1. I wish you stated how much of each ingredient is needed to make the paper. We’ve been saving hydrangea and other dried blooms to make this but have no idea how much we need….. can you help? Thanks so much!!

    1. It all depends on how many sheets you’d like to make. If you’d like to make a lot of paper, I’d get a two-gallon bucket half full of shredded paper. In terms of flowers, it depends on how dense you’d like them on the paper. If you’d like them scattered like you see in this example, you’ll only need 5 or so hydrangeas. Thankfully these materials go a long way!

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