A single specimen of Fine Line buckthorn showing its unique habit and texture.
An established specimen of Fine Line rhamnus in front of a tan ranch house.
Fine Line rhamnus growing alongside a sidewalk with a woman and dog walking nearby.
Fine Line rhamnus being used as a space saving privacy hedge.
A single specimen of Fine Line buckthorn showing its unique habit and texture.
Three Fine Line buckthorn plants grow in front of a majestic white house.

Fine Line® Buckthorn

Fine Line buckthorn is a non-invasive selection with a very unique look. Long, skinny leaves and a naturally narrow, columnar habit combine to pack a lot of interested texture and coverage into very little space. Unlike weedy buckthorns, this selection produces very little seed. It is best used as a striking specimen or planted close together for a space-saving privacy hedge. It’s also very nice as a centerpiece in decorative containers. An excellent choice for front-yard plantings, as its shape is ideal for covering with lights.

Note: Rhamnus frangula is now known as Frangula alnus.

Additional information

Dimensions2 × 5 ft
Botanical Name

<i>Rhamnus frangula</i> 'Ron Williams' pp#14,791

Zone

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Foliage Color

Green

Height

5-7'

Width/Spread

2'

Exposure

Full Sun, Part Sun

Soil

Average, Dry, Well-drained

Bloom Time

Spring

Uses

Borders, Hedges, Mass Planting, Specimen

Features

Award winner, Deer resistant, Drought tolerant, Fall interest

SKU: 62008 Plant Type:

Light: Full sun (6+ hrs/day) to part sun (4-6 hrs/day)

Soil: Any well-drained soil will do.

Water: Low to average water needs. Drought tolerant once established.

Fertilizing: Nothing special required. One application of a granular rose fertilizer in early spring is sufficient.

Pruning: Little required. In general, avoid any severe pruning or cutting back, as recovery will be slow. Any errant branches can be removed as needed. If you wish to grow it as a clipped hedge, you may, but it is necessary to keep on the process, as cuts into branches pencil-thickness or larger are slow to recover from. Time pruning for late spring, and keep well-watered during recovery.

Other notes: This is a fairly slow-growing shrub, so particularly if planting for privacy, start with the largest plants you can find. Shallow roots benefit from a good 2-3″/5-7cm layer of shredded bark mulch.

Gardening Simplified magazine
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