A close look at the white flower clusters of Ground Hug aronia.
Ground Hug aronia in full bloom being used as a ground cover around hydrangeas and arborvitae.
A planting of Ground Hug aronia being used in a yard.
A close look at the large blue-black berries of Ground Hug aronia.
Ground Hug aronia showing fall foliage color and purple black berries.
Ground Hug aronia naturally grows with a dense, ground covering habit.
Fall color of Ground Hug aronia.
A close look at the white flower clusters of Ground Hug aronia.

Ground Hug™ Aronia

You’re looking at a real problem-solving shrub. Ground Hug aronia quickly covers problematic areas, thriving even in very difficult conditions and looking great while doing it. Spring brings clusters of white flowers that attract all sorts of pollinators, and these become black-purple berries by late summer. Come autumn, it lights up in tones of red, orange, and yellow for an unforgettable season finale, before taking a rest and doing it all again the following spring. Aronia is a North American native that can grow in just about any spot, including the worst: pH extremes are no problem, nor are excessive moisture or dryness. It can grow in sun or shade, though in shade, flowering will be diminished, and fall color not as vivid.

Top reasons to grow Ground Hug aronia:

  • Transforms any area into a low-maintenance carpet of green
  • Spring flowers, summer berries, and colorful fall foliage
  • Native shrub supports pollinators and wildlife

Additional information

Dimensions3 × 0.5 ft
Botanical Name

<i>Aronia melanocarpa</i> 'UCONNAMO12' pp#31821, cbraf

Zone

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Blooms on

Old wood

Flower Color

White

Foliage Color

Green

Height

8-14"

Width/Spread

3'

Exposure

Full Sun, Part Shade

Soil

Moist

Bloom Time

Spring

Uses

Ground Cover, Mass Planting

Features

Attracts pollinators, Clay soil, Compact, Drought tolerant, Edible, Fall interest, Heat tolerant, Native, Salt tolerant

Breeder

Dr. Mark Brand, University of Connecticut

SKU: 02840 Plant Type:

Light: Full sun (6+hrs/day) to part sun (4-6 hrs/day); can grow in shadier spots but will flower far less and fall foliage will be dull

Soil: Aronia tolerates any soil, including extremes of pH, moisture, and dryness

Water: Average water needs; drought tolerant once established

Fertilizing: Nothing special required; apply a granular fertilizer formulated for woody plants in early spring if desired

Pruning: Aronia blooms on old wood, so if pruning is required, it should be pruned immediately after flowering. Do note, however, that this will remove the potential for fruit to form. If you need to manage the spread of the plant, that can be done as needed.

Other notes: Deer do not severely damage aronia plants like they do arborvitae or hosta. However, they (and rabbits, especially for low-growing varieties) may eat the flower buds or flowers, which in turn prevents fruit from forming. While its durability and fall color are still enough reason to grow it, those with deer in their area should have reasonable expectations of what may happen.

Gardening Simplified magazine
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