Lollipop crabapple is a small flowering tree with a distinctive lollipop habit.
The round canopy of Lollipop crabapple is covered with white flowers in spring.
A close look at the white flowers of Lollipop crabapple.
A flowering Lollipop crabapple covered in white flowers in front of a blooming lilac.
Lollipop crabapple bears small red fruits in late summer and fall.
Several Lollipop crabapple trees planted along the edge of a pond in a formal office landscape.
Lollipop crabapple is a small flowering tree with a distinctive lollipop habit.

Lollipop® Crabapple

One look and it’s easy to see how Lollipop crabapple (Malus sp.) got its name: with its straight trunk and rounded canopy, it does indeed look like a lollipop in the landscape! But that’s not all that’s sweet about this space-saving small tree. It’s covered in deliciously fragrant white flowers in spring, which give way to small, shiny crabapples in summer and fall. Perhaps the best thing about Lollipop crabapple is that you don’t need to do a thing to enjoy its neat habit – it just grows this way naturally, creating a beautiful, low-maintenance accent in your landscape or garden that will make all your neighbors ask about it.

Lollipop crabapple is part of the Proven Winners® ColorChoice® Trees program.

Additional information

Dimensions10 × 10 ft
Botanical Name

<i>Malus x</i> 'Lollizam'

Zone

4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Foliage Color

Green

Height

8'

Width/Spread

8'

Exposure

Full Sun

Soil

Acidic, Average, Moist, Well-drained

Bloom Time

Spring

Uses

Cottage gardens, Foundations, Fruit Production, Shade tree, Specimen, Woodland gardens

Features

Attracts pollinators, Clay soil, Disease resistant, Fall interest, Landscape plant, Tree

Breeder

Jim Zampini

Blooms On

Old wood

SKU: 17508-1-1-1 Categories: ,

Light: Full sun (6+ hrs/day)

Soil: Prefers moist but well-drained, slightly acidic soils. However, crabapples can tolerate varied conditions as long as they aren’t too extreme.

Water: Average water needs, some drought tolerance once established.

Fertilizing: If desired, fertilize in early spring using a granular (not liquid) fertilizer formulated for woody plants, like a rose or tree fertilizer. One application a year is sufficient in most areas. However, if you are starting with a very small plant, you may wish to fertilize monthly through late July to encourage more rapid growth.

Pruning: Little needed. You may selectively prune out branches to achieve a desired shape and habit if you wish, but regular pruning is neither required nor recommended.

Gardening Simplified magazine
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